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The latest job hunting, CV and interview tips to land your next job.

From our Job Tips

  • Technical Recruitment Agency - Precision People If you’re looking for a new technical engineering job, it’s important to update your CV inline with the most relevant formatting and up-to-date information. Whether you are a recent graduate looking for your first role or an experienced engineer who hasn’t updated their résumé for some time, our advice below will help make your CV ready to send to your technical recruitment consultant. Top Tier Talent As a technical recruitment agency, we scour hundreds of CV’s daily. For that reason, we speak from experience when we say; the top of your CV is the most important. As the first thing we cast our eyes over, the opening sentences should contain the most relevant information so that your CV is not dismissed. We recommend including contact information and your current job title at the top, making it easy for recruiters to see who you are, your main skills and how to get in touch with you quickly. Break It Down According to research, when a technical recruitment agency allocates your CV to a consultant, you’ve only got 7 seconds to impress. With this in mind, chunking your skills into manageable categories is key to showcasing your technical ability. Whether it’s organising your roles by sector or creating a sub-section of skills related to mechanical, electrical and PLC experiences, ensure that your different areas of expertise are clearly highlighted. Machine Magic Once your CV has made it through our rigorous technical recruitment consultancy, it is likely that it will be reviewed by an engineering manager, perhaps one who has never worked in your industry. Make it easy for them to spot why you are an ideal candidate by including any machinery you have worked on in the past, as this is a good way to detail your transferable skills. If you are seeking new technical engineering talent for your business or looking for a role we can help. Contact us today on 0116 254 5411 or email hello@precision-people.uk 

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  • Discover these seven little known tips especially for engineers to help boost your career. There's more to being a successful engineer than being good at maths and science. Regardless of whether you graduated recently or 20 years ago, there are tips and strategies you can employ to increase your chances of career advancement, some of which might be surprising. So let's take a look at some of these tips that all engineers can use to assure themselves that their careers remain on the right path. 1. Get to learn the bigger picture. This one might surprise many of you, but the reality is that engineering firms are increasingly seeking out engineers who can think like business people. They want engineers who have been involved with strategy and planning and know their way around a balance sheet and income statements. All engineers need to understand how the total costs to produce your company's products affect business decisions. 2. Think outside the box. In this case, the "box" is your respective discipline. You might have gone to college to study mechanical engineering, but many of today's complex products contain software and embedded electronics so there will be times when design issues will confront you that fall outside of your technical discipline. Learn the basics of other relevant disciplines, such as electronic and software design. 3. Become a team player. Collaborative design is a part of reality for today's product development efforts and design teams have now been expanded to include more and more people, many of which are outside of engineering. All these disciplines must come together to resolve complex issues and formulate solutions to bring products to market. As a result, communication and other "soft" skills are as important as technical expertise. 4. Be an innovator and come up with new ideas Innovation in new products is what sets successful companies apart from their competitors. Always be open to new ideas, even if they come from sources outside your group. Beware of the "Not-Invented-Here" bias that exists at some companies. Companies will reward engineers who encourage innovative ideas, regardless of where they originated. 5. Be an active networker Keep in touch with your alma mater by offering to participate in technical societies to increase your networking reach and writing technical papers and/or organising technical sessions at association conferences to enhance both your experience and your company's reputation. 6. Always keep learning skills  This is crucial as the tools used to do product design and analysis are constantly changing and improving. Stay ahead of the curve and seek out new assignments and opportunities to learn new technologies, sign up for training programs and make the most of company-paid educational benefits. Also, if possible, attend events put on by professional organizations, such as the American Society of Civil Engineers or the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. 7. Work on your "soft" skills. All forms of communication–written and verbal–are critical to advancement in engineering. If you're an engineer who wants to eventually advance into a management role, you'll need to be comfortable talking to customers, giving presentations and working with outside suppliers, agencies, etc. So developing these "soft" skills is vital. Toastmasters International, a non-profit organisation, is a great place to get your feet wet in public speaking.  Want to talk further about how Precision People can help your business contact us on 0116 254 5411 or email hello@precision-people.uk

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  • Career progression is very important to most, however, over a third of UK employees say that their career progression does not meet their expectation, largely due to the fact that many do not know how to advance their career. To advance your career in Logistics Management, you will need to have a clear plan on how to do this, otherwise, you are in danger of missing out on your potential. Here are 7 tips on how to plan yourself to advance your career: 1. Understand your career path and how to get there: To advance your career in Logistics Management, you need to understand what career moves you need to make to reach your end goal & what is required of you to do well in each role. Each step you succeed in will enable you to take that next step, with the ultimate aim of reaching that final goal. 2. Know your skills and where you can improve: Evaluate your skills and experiences to build upon so that you know how to express exactly what you can bring to a new role. You should also look at where you can possibly do better by completing certifications that will improve your skills, such as, taking a CILT course, gaining a CPC, Prince2 (Project Management) or Six Sigma qualification. Completing a postgraduate diploma, degree or Masters in Logistics/Supply Chain will also greatly round out your knowledge. 3. Know how to promote your soft skills: Soft skills are what every employer looks for as a priority, so, therefore, people skills are essential for anyone who is wanting to be successful in management. Skills such as problem-solving skills, communication skills, adaptability skills, plus a whole list of other skills are required in logistics management roles and need to be showcased on your CV as well as in your current role to stand in your favour. 4. Keep up with the latest technology trends: Technology is constantly evolving in Logistics with the emergence of new technologies and a growing demand for people who know how to use it. Keeping up with trends will put you ahead of those competing for similar roles and will help to make you become a more current and innovative leader aware of a constantly changing sector. Areas of extremely fast-paced technology changes include e-commerce, multi-channel, click & collect, home delivery and tracking systems. 5. Get out there and network: Networking makes it easier for employers to find you. You need to use your Linkedin profile as a promotional tool for yourself to sell you to the employer. For more networking opportunities, you should join associations such as the Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport (CILT) and also professional groups on Linkedin to provide you opportunities to network with people in similar positions and with those higher up to learn how they got to their position. 6. Find someone who has already walked in the shoes you want to, by finding a mentor: From networking opportunities, you may be able to find yourself a mentor. A mentor should be someone who is either near your end goal position or in that position you want to get to and can provide you with guidance on how to get to where you want. A Forbes study found that the majority of those in business who succeed have used mentors to help them progress. This allows you to be provided with a reliable second opinion on your career and to ask questions to a more experienced person on how to get to where you want. 7. Seize your opportunities Finally, you need to seize opportunities when you see them. When an opportunity arises, you need to be able to be prepared in how to react to it so that you can take advantage of it, rather than letting it go to waste. Keep these 7 tips in mind when considering your next career move in Logistics Management to allow yourself to be more prepared for how to approach your next move. Steve Eston, Senior Logistics Consultant with over ten year's experience commented: "As an industry, logistics has undergone extensive change over the past ten years in areas such as technology, culture, engagement and added value activities that firms are offering to their clients. Whilst the sector has evolved a long way during that time, one area that still needs focus is that of career guidance and development. Whilst there are exceptions, the onus still mainly sits with the individual to push their career forward and to maximise their potential. Having worked in Logistics for 7 years before going into recruitment, I found out first-hand that this was the case. Making yourself more valuable as a commodity (both internally within your business and externally to outside employers) is key to this. I would strongly suggest doing all you can to develop yourself academically but also study for qualifications in relevant areas i.e. CPC, Six Sigma, Prince2, IOSH, NEBOSH etc. Gaining exposure and knowledge of systems such as JDA/Red Prairie or Manhattan (for warehouse) or Paragon & Isotrak (for transport) are really helpful. Within a warehouse environment, working within fully or semi-automated sites would also give you a wider perspective and therefore, more valuable. Exposure to trade unions negotiations and unionised environments are also something I would encourage someone to do where possible. Finally, having the attitude of "going above and beyond" is key to you taking that next step. I am not suggesting working yourself into the ground, but staying late occasionally to box off a project or taking extra responsibilities outside of your job description is a great way to show that you are ready, willing and able to take that next step." Take a look at our live Senior Logistics jobs here or to chat further with Steve by emailing him on stevene@precionsearch.co.uk Steve Eston is Associate Director, Logistics Division of Precision Search and has over seven year's operational experience in Transport, TP and Warehousing within various sectors. 

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  • Body language it's something so important, yet something we give very little thought to, especially at work. Body language actually accounts for over 55% of the overall message, with tone of voice 38% and the words you speak, just 7%. So being aware of your body language is one of the most subtle, yet important things to master at work. If you're not in tune with what your posture, facial expressions, and other nonverbal cues, you could be revealing your true feelings to your fellow sales colleagues, which means potentially you could be setting yourself up failure. Here are 7 powerful tips to help sales in the workplace:- 1. Want to sound authoritative? Keep your voice down Before a speech or important telephone call, allow your voice to relax into its optimal pitch by keeping your lips together and making the sounds "um hum, um hum, um hum." Instead, when stating your opinion, use the authoritative arc, in which your voice starts on one note, rises in pitch through the sentence and drops back down at the end. 2. Feelings little nervous? Assume a power pose to boost your confidence Research at Harvard and Columbia Business Schools shows that simply holding your body in expansive, "high-power" poses (leaning back with hands behind the head and feet up on a desk, or standing with legs and arms stretched wide open) for as little as two minutes stimulates higher levels of testosterone—the hormone linked to power and dominance—and lower levels of cortisol, a stress hormone. Try this when you're feeling tentative but want to appear confident. In addition to causing hormonal shifts in both males and females, these poses lead to increased feelings of power and a higher tolerance for risk. The study also found that people are more often influenced by how they feel about you than by what you're saying. 3. To increase participation, look like you're listening If you want people to speak up, don't multitask while they do. Avoid the temptation to check your text messages, check your watch, or check out how the other participants are reacting. Instead, focus on those who are speaking by turning your head and torso to face them directly and by making eye contact. Leaning forward, nodding, and tilting your head are other nonverbal ways to show you're engaged and paying attention. It's important to hear people. It's just as important to make sure they know you are listening. 4. To encourage collaboration, remove barriers Physical obstructions are especially detrimental to collaborative efforts. Take away anything that blocks your view or forms a barrier between you and the rest of the sales team. Even during a coffee break, be aware that you may create a barrier by holding your cup and saucer in a way that seems deliberately to block your body or distance you from others. A senior sales executive told me he could evaluate his sales team's comfort by how high they held their coffee cups. It was his observation that the more insecure individuals felt, the higher they held their coffee. People with their hands held at waist level were more comfortable than those with hands chest high. 5. Want to improve your speech? Use your hands Brain imaging has shown that a region called Broca's area, which is important for speech production, is active not only when we're talking, but when we wave our hands. Since gesture is integrally linked to speech, gesturing as we talk can actually power up our thinking. Experiment with this and you'll find that the physical act of gesturing helps you form clearer thoughts and speak in tighter sentences with more declarative language. 6. Want to stimulate good feelings? Then smile! A genuine smile not only stimulates your own sense of well-being, it also tells those around you that you are approachable, cooperative, and trustworthy. A genuine smile comes on slowly, crinkles the eyes, lights up the face, and fades away slowly. Most importantly, smiling directly influences how other people respond to you. When you smile at someone, they almost always smile in return. And, because facial expressions trigger corresponding feelings, the smile you get back actually changes that person's emotional state in a positive way. 7. Trying to get to the bottom of an issue? To learn the truth, watch people's feet When people try to control their body language, they focus primarily on facial expressions, body postures, and hand/arm gestures. Since the legs and feet are left unrehearsed, they are also where the truth can most often be found. Under stress, people will often display nervousness and anxiety through increased foot movements. Feet will fidget, shuffle, and wind around each other or around the furniture. Feet will stretch and curl to relieve tension, or even kick out in a miniaturized attempt to run away. Studies show that observers have greater success judging a person's real emotional state when they can see the entire body. You may not know it, but instinctively you've been reacting to foot gestures all your life. Keep these 7 tips in mind, the next time you're talking to your fellow sales colleagues, to see what their body language is really saying and also be aware of what your body language is revealing to other sales people. Article written by Natalie Chapman, Senior Sales Consultant at Precision Recruitment, specialist consultants in Engineering, Technical and Sales sectors. We help our clients find exactly the right candidates to help grow their businesses. Contact us today on 0116 254 5411 or email hello@precision-people.uk  Click here to find out about our different sales sectors and how we can help your business.

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  • For professionals in every field LinkedIn is an indispensable tool. However, only having a profile is not enough, especially for high skilled technical professionals. Careers that are based on specific technical skills and expertise (e.g. engineers, IT experts, developers) need to do more if they're going to get the most out of LinkedIn. As of this year, LinkedIn has over 364 million users across over 200 countries around the globe. LinkedIn is also the 14th most visited site on the web. The popularity of this site means getting the most out of it could be very beneficial. Use these tips to improve your brand, build your network and get noticed by recruitment consultants and hiring managers. 8 tips to get the most out of LinkedIn 1. Ensure your profile is complete This is a must for every LinkedIn user. You need to make sure that your LinkedIn profile is completed before even thinking about starting your networking. On the right of your profile page there is a Profile strength meter, if this meter is not at 'All-star' then you're not taking advantage of one of the easiest ways to get noticed on LinkedIn. To maximise the completion of your profile, include a detailed account of your career history which includes a description of your current role, your responsibilities, and your best achievements. If you have a technical role then be sure to include relevant information. For example, coding language or technology used. Your profile will not be complete without a profile picture, so add a good high quality head and shoulders image so people will be able to recognise you. No pictures of you relaxing on the beach or kicking back with a beer – keep it professional! 2. Express Yourself In the 'Summary' section of your profile, write a compelling outline of your career, your skills and your professional interests. Look at this as a lead paragraph within a newspaper article as if it doesn't attract the reader, it's less likely for them to continue reading. 3. Construct your network Connect with colleagues you know, whether they're current or old. Also seek out professionals who work in companies that you have an interest in and ask them to connect. You could add a note that you'd would like to find out more about their company and ask if they would be willing to talk to you. It is also a good way to keep track of any job that might become available. 4. Join professional groups – lots of them! LinkedIn has over 1.5 million groups. Joining and interacting with a few will expose you to your professional peers. You will only get the most out of this feature if you participate. 5. Find groups relevant to you and your skills Look through various groups until you find a few that suit your career. Be a part of lively discussions that are relevant to your interests and build your network. Participating in these group will also gain the attention of recruiters as they search through to find skilled and knowledgeable professionals. 6. Don't neglect the extras On your LinkedIn profile, it allows you to include any awards, patents, certifications, languages and projects. For technical professionals especially, it allows you talk in depth about the extent of what skills and knowledge you have. The 'Skills' sections is equally as important as again it is a great way to advertise the skill-specific endorsements and knowledge from your network. 7. Companies that interest you LinkedIn has over 4 million company pages. Following companies allows you to keep up to date with company news and updates, they may even mention jobs openings. 8. Seek out specialist recruitment consultants Recruitment consultants are a valuable asset to connect with on Linked-in, even if you're happy in your current role. Search for consultants who have experience and knowledge and who find roles for people with the same skill set you possess and connect with them. They can give you advice on pay scales and information on what's happening within your field. It pays to be connected to the experts, you never know when you might need one. A good consultant will sometimes have exclusive knowledge of vacancies in your market and maybe the first person to be made aware of job openings. If you would like to talk to a specialist consultant about technical roles and how we can help you, contact Jon Wesbter on 0116 254 5411 or email jonw@precisionrecruitment.co.uk today.

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  • Even if you're not thinking of changing your sales role any time soon, it's good practice to keep your CV up to date and current, so you have it ready, should a new opportunity arise. If you've not moved sales positions for a while, chances are your CV is probably out of date. Here are 7 tips that will help you get your sales executive CV in great shape. Tip: 1 Write more than one page Don't worry if your CV runs over to more than one page. To give the potential employer your full profile, you need to list all your details. It is a myth that employer's prefer shorter CV's. So put everything down in a clear concise manner, even if this runs into three or even four pages. Tip 2 Use bullet points Bullet points are easy to read, and allows the potential employer to quickly skim through and identify keywords that they are looking for. Use bullet points to breakdown your skills and efforts in a particular project. Tip 3 Shout about your successes! A potential employer or recruitment consultant is not psychic and hasn't got the time to read between the lines. Experience needs to be declared rather than implied. List sales figures you smashed or projects you performed and provide details as to how you were involved and your responsibilities. If there were problems highlight these and your ability to come up with the solution. Tip 4 List professional experiences first This means that while having a related degree may be necessary, you should list it after your professional experience. It seems unfair but the fact of the matter is that the first few years of your career are spent learning what should have been taught at University. The smaller jobs you did early on are not going to be relevant so leave these out. Tip 5 Use Social Media Social media outlets such as Linkedin and Twitter, gives you the opportunity to use your profiles to enhance your CV online. Linkedin can be used as an enhanced CV by duplicating the information on your CV and then filling in the extras that Linkedin allows. A few examples of some enhancements that can be made through social media are: getting colleagues to verify your skills, sales teams you built or were a part of getting recommendations from fellow colleagues and then also cross linking colleagues on sales teams and departments This provides employers with the ability to cross reference what they are being told and verify that the material is in fact real. Tip 6 – Use a credible, specific and dedicated email address Use an email address with a professional address. Recently we have had candidates supply us with hilarious email addresses from anything from 'dickymint'@ to 'littlebakedbean@! Which has given us some real chuckles in the office, however, you need to create an email address that is credible. You could use the word 'job' within the address and create a new email address to use specifically for your job hunting. Using email systems such as gmail it's easy to set up more than one email address. Tip 7 Update your CV twice a year The worst time to update your CV is when you're looking for a new sales role. Going for long periods of time without updates, usually results in gaps of information or misrepresentation from just forgetting what you did and when! How to solve the problem: Diary twice in your year to spend an hour or so updating your CV with new projects, skills etc, this way your CV will be up to date and ready to send out should a new role arise. This article was written by Natalie Chapman Senior Search Consultant, Specialising in Placing Construction Sales People for Precision Recruitment. Contact 0116 254 5411 or email natalie@precisionrecruitment.co.uk.  

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  • Even if you're not thinking of changing your sales role any time soon, it's good practice to keep your CV up to date and current, so you have it ready, should a new opportunity arise. If you've not moved sales positions for a while, chances are your CV is probably out of date. Here are 7 tips that will help you get your sales executive CV in great shape. Tip: 1 Write more than one page Don't worry if your CV runs over to more than one page. To give the potential employer your full profile, you need to list all your details. It is a myth that employer's prefer shorter CV's. So put everything down in a clear concise manner, even if this runs into three or even four pages. Tip 2 Use bullet points Bullet points are easy to read, and allows the potential employer to quickly skim through and identify keywords that they are looking for. Use bullet points to breakdown your skills and efforts in a particular project. Tip 3 Shout about your successes! A potential employer or recruitment consultant is not psychic and hasn't got the time to read between the lines. Experience needs to be declared rather than implied. List sales figures you smashed or projects you performed and provide details as to how you were involved and your responsibilities. If there were problems highlight these and your ability to come up with the solution. Tip 4 List professional experiences first This means that while having a related degree may be necessary, you should list it after your professional experience. It seems unfair but the fact of the matter is that the first few years of your career are spent learning what should have been taught at University. The smaller jobs you did early on are not going to be relevant so leave these out. Tip 5 Use Social Media Social media outlets such as Linkedin and Twitter, gives you the opportunity to use your profiles to enhance your CV online. Linkedin can be used as an enhanced CV by duplicating the information on your CV and then filling in the extras that Linkedin allows. A few examples of some enhancements that can be made through social media are: getting colleagues to verify your skills, sales teams you built or were a part of getting recommendations from fellow colleagues and then also cross linking colleagues on sales teams and departments This provides employers with the ability to cross reference what they are being told and verify that the material is in fact real. Tip 6 – Use a credible, specific and dedicated email address Use an email address with a professional address. Recently we have had candidates supply us with hilarious email addresses from anything from 'dickymint'@ to 'littlebakedbean@! Which has given us some real chuckles in the office, however, you need to create an email address that is credible. You could use the word 'job' within the address and create a new email address to use specifically for your job hunting. Using email systems such as gmail it's easy to set up more than one email address. Tip 7 Update your CV twice a year The worst time to update your CV is when you're looking for a new sales role. Going for long periods of time without updates, usually results in gaps of information or misrepresentation from just forgetting what you did and when! How to solve the problem: Diary twice in your year to spend an hour or so updating your CV with new projects, skills etc, this way your CV will be up to date and ready to send out should a new role arise. This article was written by Natalie Chapman Senior Search Consultant, Specialising in Placing Construction Sales People for Precision Recruitment. Contact 0116 254 5411 or email natalie@precisionrecruitment.co.uk Check out the latest sales job here.

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  • First of all congratulations on being offered your new sales job! It doesn't matter if you loved or hated your job, leaving your current sales position with pride in a professional manner is essential for protecting your long-term career plans. Resign in person to your boss Your boss should be the first person who you tell about resigning before anybody else - even before your mates down the pub! This is important because it saves word of your departure from possibly getting round and reaching your boss before you get to tell them. The best and most respectful way to tell your boss you're leaving is face-to-face so you can discuss why you have made your decision to leave. The next best alternative is having the conversation with your boss via phone. You should also take a handwritten notice along with you when resigning since it's not only more professional but in many cases, you will need to have a written resignation for legal reasons. It's key that you keep your written resignation short and sweet, a simple thank you and an end date will be sufficient for it. First thing Monday morning might not be appropriate, but perhaps book a time in their diary so you have a few minutes to explain your decision, rather than being rushed out the door as they fly off to a meeting. If you're professional in your approach, expect your boss to be too For many, one of the hardest parts of the process of resigning is the fear of how your boss may react to the news of your departure. People often fear that their boss will have an adverse reaction to the news. However, if you handle yourself professionally, a good boss will be happy to see their employee move on to a new opportunity to further their career. Thank your boss and your colleagues Having a strong network is very important in sales, making it vital to make an effort to keep in touch with your former colleagues in case you can benefit from their help in the future. Thanking your boss and colleagues will also help with receiving a strong reference from them when your future employer asks for one. Be careful when considering accepting a counter-offer If you have been offered a counter-offer, you need to weigh up accepting it fully since it's estimated that around 80% of people who accept counter offers will leave within 6 to 12 months. Do you want to go back to the start of job searching again a few months down the line if all your needs are not met and you continue to not be happy in your job? Work your resignation properly It may be tempting to give your last few weeks not as much focus as you normally would, however, this will be your lasting impression with colleagues and Managers so it pays to work hard and be cooperative right up until the day you leave. Be helpful by ensuring you give a detailed handover, not leaving colleagues second guessing over clients and deals. You may even get a nice leaving present! After you've started your new role it might be a good idea to announce it on social media and update your LinkedIn page - don't do it before you have left or post comments about why you left that don't look professional. Don't write 'My boss was rubbish!' or 'It was an unprofessional place to work." If you're looking for a new role in Sales, take a look at our live Sales jobs here or contact our Senior Sales Recruitment Consultant, Natalie Chapman on 0116 254 5411 or email natalie@precisionrecruitment.co.uk.

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  • As the Internet of Things continues to change the face of manufacturing creating the 4th industrial revolution, engineering jobs are constantly changing and increasingly more technical roles are being created.  The methods by which engineering companies are recruiting and interviewing candidates is also changing with 10% of all interviews being conducted by Skype.  "46% of employers have reduced the length of the hiring process to improve the talent attraction stage." Skype interviews are one of the ways in which they're achieving this. If you haven't had a Skype interview before, don't panic, here are ten tips to help you deliver a professional and confident interview. 1. Think about the backdrop and prepare your surroundings What can the interviewers see behind you? If there is clutter, clear it. Don't have too many personal items on show, they don't need to see photos of you on the beach. Ideally, you need to sit at a clear desk. 2. Inform everyone in the house Let everyone know in the house what time your interview is - you don't want to be disturbed by the dog barging in or the children fighting and screaming. If it's easier, get someone round to look after the children and walk the dog beforehand. Just ensure you're in a quiet environment where you won't be disturbed.  3. Turn your gadgets off It's not just the dog, the children or your spouse that can be a disturbance and interruption. Your devices can be too. Make sure you silence your phone. Turn off notifications on your computer. Close your Facebook tab. Exit your mail account. You don't want any unplanned disturbances. It can be a distraction both to you and your interviewer. 4. Practice a mock interview with a friend Ask a friend to Skype you, so you can practice what to do with your hands, how to sit, if the light is bright enough and how loud the speakers should be. You can record it to see how you look. Also, check everything from a technical perspective that everything is working. You don't want to start the interview and find out that your speakers aren't on the right setting and your interviewer can't hear you! If using a laptop check your have charged it sufficiently. 5. Remember to smile If the interviewer was present in the room your natural reaction would be to smile. This is harder if you're sitting in a room on your own. Just before, practice smiling or even have a funny picture out of site to remind you to keep smiling throughout. 6. Maintain eye contact Although it may feel weird looking at your webcam, make sure you do – not the screen. Not only will it help you by making it feel a bit more like an in-person interview, but it also helps avoid the guilty habit everyone has – looking at yourself in the bottom corner! 7. Address any tech issues Things can go wrong and your interviewer will be understanding of that. Make sure you remain calm and relaxed whilst trying to resolve the issue. If you can't hear the question because of a weak wifi signal or interference, address it straight away, don't wait. If it gets really difficult, the best thing to do is stop the call and re-dial. This shows that you're a problem solver and willing to sort problems out quickly. 8. Dress the part First impressions are important. Just because you're not at the office or you're not on-site doesn't mean you shouldn't dress the part. Firstly, dressing the part will help you feel like you're at an in-person interview and get you in the right frame of mind. Secondly, the recruiter is likely to perceive you in a different light if you're well dressed and prepared for the occasion. 9. Is your username professional? A simple username that just includes your name, is a lot more professional than a weird nickname for example. First impressions count and no doubt, your username address will be the first thing your recruiter sees and analyses. 10 Give it a go! It may seem daunting having a skype interview if you have not experienced it before. However, like most tasks, if you approach it with a plan, practice your answers to the potential interview questions thoroughly, and use the tips above, you will definitely create a professional impression to your potential new employer.  Whether you're looking for a new engineering job or thinking about hiring, contact our team today on 0116 254 5411 or email hello@precision-people.uk 

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  • What every engineer should discover about body language - 7 tips  Body language it's something so important, yet we give it very little thought to, especially at work, whether on the shopfloor or the office. Body language actually accounts for over 55% of the overall message, with tone of voice 38% and the words you speak, just 7%. So being aware of your body language is one of the most subtle, yet important things to master at work. If you're not in tune with what your posture, facial expressions, and other nonverbal cues, you could be revealing your true feelings to your fellow work colleagues and engineers, which means potentially you could be setting yourself up failure. Here are 7 powerful tips to help you in your workplace: 1. Want to sound authoritative? Keep your voice down Before a speech or important telephone call, allow your voice to relax into its optimal pitch by keeping your lips together and making the sounds "um hum, um hum, um hum." Instead, when stating your opinion, use the authoritative arc, in which your voice starts on one note, rises in pitch through the sentence and drops back down at the end. 2. Feelings little nervous? Assume a power pose to boost your confidence Research at Harvard and Columbia Business Schools shows that simply holding your body in expansive, "high-power" poses (leaning back with hands behind the head and feet up on a desk, or standing with legs and arms stretched wide open) for as little as two minutes stimulates higher levels of testosterone—the hormone linked to power and dominance—and lower levels of cortisol, a stress hormone. Try this when you're feeling tentative but want to appear confident. In addition to causing hormonal shifts in both males and females, these poses lead to increased feelings of power and a higher tolerance for risk. The study also found that people are more often influenced by how they feel about you than by what you're saying. 3. To increase participation, look like you're listening If you want people to speak up, don't multitask while they do. Avoid the temptation to check your text messages, check your watch, or check out how the other participants are reacting. Instead, focus on those who are speaking by turning your head and torso to face them directly and by making eye contact. Leaning forward, nodding, and tilting your head are other nonverbal ways to show you're engaged and paying attention. It's important to hear people. It's just as important to make sure they know you are listening. 4. To encourage collaboration, remove barriers Physical obstructions are especially detrimental to collaborative efforts. Take away anything that blocks your view or forms a barrier between you and the rest of the team. Even during a coffee break, be aware that you may create a barrier by holding your cup and saucer in a way that seems deliberately to block your body or distance you from others. A senior executive told me he could evaluate his team's comfort by how high they held their coffee cups. It was his observation that the more insecure individuals felt, the higher they held their coffee. People with their hands held at waist level were more comfortable than those with hands chest high. 5. Want to improve your speech? Use your hands Brain imaging has shown that a region called Broca's area, which is important for speech production, is active not only when we're talking, but when we wave our hands. Since gesture is integrally linked to speech, gesturing as we talk can actually power up our thinking. Experiment with this and you'll find that the physical act of gesturing helps you form clearer thoughts and speak in tighter sentences with more declarative language. 6. Want to stimulate good feelings? then smile! A genuine smile not only stimulates your own sense of well-being, it also tells those around you that you are approachable, cooperative, and trustworthy. A genuine smile comes on slowly, crinkles the eyes, lights up the face, and fades away slowly. Most importantly, smiling directly influences how other people respond to you. When you smile at someone, they almost always smile in return. And, because facial expressions trigger corresponding feelings, the smile you get back actually changes that person's emotional state in a positive way. 7. Trying to get to the bottom of an issue? to learn the truth, watch people's feet When people try to control their body language, they focus primarily on facial expressions, body postures, and hand/arm gestures. Since the legs and feet are left unrehearsed, they are also where the truth can most often be found. Under stress, people will often display nervousness and anxiety through increased foot movements. Feet will fidget, shuffle, and wind around each other or around the furniture. Feet will stretch and curl to relieve tension, or even kick out in a miniaturized attempt to run away. Studies show that observers have greater success judging a person's real emotional state when they can see the entire body. You may not know it, but instinctively you've been reacting to foot gestures all your life. Keep these 7 tips in mind, the next time you're talking to your fellow engineering colleagues to see what their body language is really saying and also be aware of what your body language is revealing to other people. This article is written by Phil Walker, Recruitment Director at Precision Recruitment. Precision are specialist recruiters in the fields of engineering, technical and sales recruitment operating in the Midlands with positions nationwide. Looking for a new engineering or technical role? Check out our latest roles right here. Call us on 0116 254 5411 or email your cv to info@precisionrecruitment.co.uk Like this article? Why not watch this video 'How to prepare for an interview...and nail it!'

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  • Research shows being afraid you're going to lose your job can be worse than actually losing your job: "...perceived job insecurity ranks as one of the most important factors in employees' well-being and can be even more harmful than actual job loss with subsequent unemployment" Subsequently wanting to find a new job in the new year can also cause you fear. 'What if I don't get any interviews?' 'What if the other candidates are better than me?' 'What if my current boss finds out?' 'What if I move to the wrong company?' 'What if I don't get on with my colleagues or team?' That little voice inside your head can go on an on. Remember the little voice is designed to keep you safe - admittedly from tigers and being eaten but nevertheless, it's designed to make sure you don't do anything or go anywhere that might cause you harm. We have placed many people in new jobs and have seen candidates react in all sorts of ways when the fear hits them. Some have been almost paralysed by their own thoughts and have actually declined job offers and made up excuses when the truth is they were too scared to leave their existing job and accept a new one - into the unknown.  Don't be one of these people! Here are 3 tips to help you through the fear and get the new job you want in 2017. So how can we actually conquer fear? 1. Control Firstly, take control over the situation. When we feel in control, we're not afraid. When we have a level of comfort with something, it's not scary. Anything that gives you a feeling of control over your situation helps you keep your cool. Without a feeling of control, when stress gets high we literally can't think straight. Amy Arnsten states, "The loss of prefrontal function only occurs when we feel out of control. It's the prefrontal cortex itself that is determining if we are in control or not. Even if we have the illusion that we are in control, over cognitive functions are preserved." The perception of being in control is a major driver of behaviour and why fear often seems so random and irrational. For example, think about driving for a second. You're cruising down the motorway at 70 miles per hour. But that's not scary? Why? You're used to it. You feel in control. Even though the person next to you could be too busy texting (whilst driving) and crash into your car, and in seconds, that could be your life lost to someone else's thoughtless actions – but you don't give it a thought. But, do you know what is scary? Something strange, something uncommon - oh no, we're not used to it. And we try all those avoidance mechanisms, you know – avoiding it, ignoring it, denying it, dismissing it. And guess what? None of that works. So what's the solution? You have to get closer to your fears. 2. Gradually expose yourself to your fears "Face your fears." The cliché phrase, probably everyone is sick of hearing. But, it is only then that you will stop being afraid. According to Harvard Medical School Professor, Ronald Siegal: "Now that you've developed a clear experience of anxiety, try intensifying it. Make it as strong as you can while sitting here holding this book... Once you feel as though you've generated about as much anxiety as you can muster, see if you can hold on to it... If it starts to fade, try to intensify it again. Now that you've practiced bearing your anxiety, you can bring your attention back to your breath for a few more minutes and feel what this is like" For example. Take a second. Think about your worst fear. Maybe it's speaking in public. So you're speaking in public and everyone is utterly bored by you and not paying attention. Hold on that for a second. It stings, but stay with me. Now make your fear worse. You're speaking in public and you wet yourself. Everyone laughs. It's mortifying. But spend a second there. Now make it even worse. The whole thing is recorded and gets 3 million views on YouTube. Stay with it. No, you're not going to die. Now relax. Just follow your breathing — in and out — for a few seconds. You're on your way to conquering your fear. Really thinking about just how awful things can be, often has the ironic effect of making you realise they're not that bad. 3. Prepare Preparation is another means of control. Now you have identified your fears, you can do something to make sure it never happens. You can take control. According to Johnson and Leach, the sort of people who survive are the sort of people who prepare for the worst and practice ahead of the time. They've done the research, or built the shelter, or run the drills. They look for the exits and imagine what they will do... These people don't deliberate during calamity because they've already done the deliberation the other people around them are just now going through. Lastly, try and look on the bright side of life.  You don't need to be fearless, that would make you slightly inhumane! But you do need to have a sense of humor. Humour is a powerful buffer against stress and fear. And, well, what's so bad about having a laugh?! Face your fears, because fear is usually worse than what we're afraid of. And, of course, laugh along the way. As Bertolt Brecht said: Do not fear death so much, but rather the inadequate life.  For a chat about your new career, why not face your fears and contact us on 0116 254 5411 or email info@precisonrecruitment.co.uk 

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  • Are you thinking about a new service engineer job in 2018? Do you need to update your CV? It's can easy to make simple mistakes, especially if you haven't updated your CV for a long time. It' s important to remember, your CV is what consultants and your prospective employers are using to make their first impression of you, so make sure it looks professional and includes all the right content. Using these proven seven top tips you can ensure your CV is identified and remembered by key engineering recruiters and employers. Check and check again for typos An alarmingly high number of CV's contain grammatical mistakes. Remember, this is an important document and it will appear unprofessional if you haven't spent time correcting typos. If your grammar is not your strongest point, ask a friend or partner to read through it or use free software such as Grammarly to check everything is spelt correctly and you've used the right punctuation. Keywords are key!  Engineering recruitment consultants search for your CV using specific industry related keywords. So it's important to think about what keywords you have on your CV. If your job were field-based for example, make sure you put this in the title of your jobs along with any systems you have worked with, list them all.  This way you will come up in the searches which will increase your chances of being contacted about opportunities right for you. Think keywords! Key information at the top When looking for specialist service engineering candidates, many CVs will be looked at by consultants. Therefore, CV's that don't look professional or are missing key information from the top are dismissed. Make sure your key information is clear and at the top of your CV. This means putting your contact information and current job role right at the top, making it easy for recruiters to see who you are, your main skills and how to contact you quickly. Use Linked-in as a good reference tool  Make sure your once you have updated your CV that your LinkedIn profile mirrors your CV to ensure continuity. Many engineering recruitment consultants use LinkedIn as well as potential employers. It's also a clever tip to look at LinkedIn profiles for key people within your industry sector. See what skills they have and how they've used them to their advantage, try to mirror this on your own CV.  List the key skills of your job in your CV  When applying for a specific service engineering role, look at the job brief and what key skills they are looking for in the candidate. Try to include these key skills on your CV and provide evidence of how you've done them. This will not only show the employer that you have researched the role but also that you have everything they're looking for in a candidate. If this means you have to tweak your CV for several different job applications, then do it! It's about tailoring your skills to meet the job requirements. Make your CV easy to access  Make sure it is saved under a professional name so employers can find your CV easily on their own computer systems (eg not UPDATED COPY OF CV but A.Jones - CV) It is also best to save it as a .doc document, this type of file is able to be viewed by all word processing programs. If you have a smartphone, it is also a good idea to save a copy your CV on your phone. This means you can apply for jobs quickly and easily as you see them. If you have Gmail you can use google drive or drop box. If your CV is on the job site Indeed, you can simply apply using the Indeed button.  And finally....insider secret tip.... The more recently you have updated your CV, the higher it will be up a search engine and job posting board results. By making very small changes about once a week to your CV and then updating it online, it will appear nearer the top of search engine results and therefore, you will be far easier for engineering recruiters to find! (You're welcome!) Why not set a reminder on your phone once a week? It will take you just 30 seconds and could dramatically increase your chances. Remember, your CV is a very important document and it should represent all the reasons employers should want to work with you. Providing you follow these seven key tips you will be able to create a CV that is easy to find, looks professional and has all the right content to make service engineer specialist consultants identify you and contact you. Whether you're looking for a new Service Engineer role or you are looking to hire engineers, read more here about how we can help your business, call  0116 254 5411 or email natashab@precisionrecruitment.co.uk  Click here to see the latest service engineer jobs.  

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  • Whether you fancy a change within the lift & escalator industry; you have unfortunately been made redundant recently, or you are looking at roles after gaining your qualifications, knowing how to kick start your job search in the lift industry can be a daunting task, but it shouldn't. To kick off the job search in the best way, it is important that you have a clear strategy which clarifies what you want and the best way to get there. Your strategy should include the following: 1. Identify exactly what lift role you want and what you need to get it It may seem simple but just knowing what role you want and what is required of the role is what you should start with when starting your job search. An NVQ level 3 is now becoming more of a mandatory requirement for most lift companies. However, if you haven't got your NVQ level 3, don't worry, companies may offer the training or you can still try approaching smaller lift and escalator firms who sometimes don't insist on this qualification. 2. Update and perféct your CV Once you know what is required of you, you then need to showcase how you can do this through your CV. When thinking about how to write your CV, Rebecca Corfield, author of Knockout Job Presentations says that you need to "Be unforgettable for the right reasons. Impact comes from strong words, having a clear and logical layout, and detail about what makes you special." Doing this will help you stand out from other candidates and help to put you at the top of the pile. 3. Look to expand your lift industry knowledge You need to show a willingness to expand your knowledge and skill sets. Improving these allows you to be able to complete more tasks, take on jobs which require a greater skill level and also teach others which all help to make you more employable. 4. Network like crazy! Networking is an essential part for when you are undertaking your job search. This can be as simple as speaking to someone who you used to work with to find out if there are any roles at where they work now. In general, 55% of jobs in normal markets are filled through some level of personal contact. However, the lift industry is a tight network where everybody tends to know everybody, making having an emphasis on networking even more important. 5. Optimise your best hours Finally, you need to use your time wisely. Spending all of your time job hunting can be very draining and can leave you feeling fairly unmotivated, so it is usually best practice to search in short bursts. This could time such as a couple of hours in the evening during downtime, or during the weekend when you can focus a bit more. Fancy a chat with a specialist lift & escalator recruitment consultant? Contact Lindsey today on 0116 254 5411 or email Lindseyb@precisionrecruitment.co.uk. Click here to find out about out how Lifts & Escalator specialist consultant Lindsey can help find you a new job today or take a look at our live specialist lifts and escalator jobs here.

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  • Phone interviews are becoming a more common method in the interview screening process with 60% of under 34 years old completing a phone interview compared to 32% of 45 to 50-year-olds, according to a survey by Shortlister.com. Telephone interviews are usually conducted in the early stages of the recruitment process to narrow down the number of applicants. Phone interviews are conducted by both recruitment consultants, to assess a) if it is a job role that you are interested in and b) whether you are the right fit to put forward to a client. They're also conducted by potential new employers, especially if the key people are not in the same office or city and juggling diaries are difficult. If you have a phone interview scheduled soon, don't panic, just make sure you prepare. You can follow these seven tips to best perform and achieve interview success. 1. Cut out all distractions Put the dog in the kitchen and tell the children to go and play in their rooms if you need to. You need to focus and to do this you don't need any interruptions, it also sounds unprofessional if there are disturbances in the background. Tip - If you have a noisy household, take the call from your car where you won't be disturbed, you don't have to drive anywhere. 2. Have your CV in front of you Your recruitment consultant or potential new employer will have your CV in front of them, so it's almost a given that they will ask you about your past experiences, qualifications and education. As in a real interview, think about your answers to any questions you may be asked and write some notes down beforehand. Make sure you have your CV in front of you to re-jog your memory on what you wrote. It would also be helpful to have a pen and notepad at hand to take any relevant notes. Tip - You have the added advantage that the interviewer can only hear you not see you, so really use this to pre-write notes to questions that may come up - even bullet point prompts on a card to help you. 3. Make a list of your USPs (Unique Selling Points) Consider your strengths and list the things that might set you aside from other candidates. Remember, there are likely to be many other applicants applying for the same position so you need to make the recruiter aware of why they should employ you and not another candidate. You can also refer to these when the interviewer asks about yourself and why you would be suitable for the role. 4. Remember to smile Even though your interviewer can't see you, it's important to smile when you speak. It makes a big difference to your tone of voice and it helps ensure you sound upbeat. The interviewer wants to know you enthusiastic about this job position and that you're genuinely interested. Make sure your tone of voice conveys this. Tip - If using your mobile make sure it's charged and you are in a good service area 5. Listen to the interviewer This is probably one of, if not the most important tip to a telephone interview. Make sure you listen to the interviewer to ensure you grasp their questions and pay attention to information they're providing. It may be helpful to write notes of information for future reference. Remember, you can ask questions if you don't understand. 6. Write down any questions you want to ask It is likely that your interviewer will ask if you have any questions throughout the interview and/or at the end of the interview. It is a good opportunity for you to find out more about the role you've applied for, the company you could potentially be working for and if there are any future opportunities within the company. This is where a pen and notepad will come in handy for note taking. It also shows that you're inquisitive. 7. Do your research You might be asked questions like; "Why do you want to work for [company name]?" "What projects or work have we carried out that have particularly interested you?" And so forth, you want to be prepared for questions like these. It is also a good chance to impress the interviewer by showing that you've done your research on the company by reading their website and social media, and news articles. Tip - Add a professional touch by sending a follow up thank you email for their time and confirm your interest in the position Telephone interviews are just as important as face to face interviews and conveying the right degree of professionalism is vital to get you through to the second phase. Follow these proven tips for telephone interview success and you will succeed - good luck! And if you want to know how to visualise your next dream job watch this quick video on 'visualisation' Like this? Why not read: "10 crucial tips for your skype interview."

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  • A Counter offer. An offer made in response to a previous job offer by the other party during negotiations for a final contract. Do they benefit businesses or employees in the long run? Who does it work out for? If you're a business owner, should you counter offer an employee who has been actively looking for a new job and accepted? An employee who is so unhappy in their current position he or she has decided to look elsewhere - maybe even to a competitor's. Let's look at some scenarios. You're Jim the Sales Manager and a member of your team, Kate, has just handed in her notice. Arguably, your first thought if you didn't have any inkling, is one of surprise, followed quickly by panic. You haven't got time for this! A replacement will a) cost money b) take ages to get up to speed and c) take up lots of your time sifting through CV's and carrying out endless interviews. So, what do you do? The easiest option - offer Kate more money to stay and not rock the boat. You offer Kate £5,000, that should be enough for her to stay. All sorted.   You're Kate who's just been offered a new sales role at a rival firm. Your current Sale Manager has offered you £5,0000 to stay. £5,000 - wow. It's a shame they couldn't have offered that to you in a pay rise last year. Still it's flattering. You won't have to move jobs, you won't be the new person, less risk if your new job doesn't work out - it's easier to stay where you know. A £5000 pay rise from £35,000 up to £40,000 is actually only around £65 extra a week into your bank account. Is that enough to stay and ignore the other reasons why you decided to look for a new job? Think! What are the reasons in the first place you contacted a recruitment consultant. Was it actually about wanting a higher salary? Or was it because you were under too much pressure, working long hours or not seeing your family as much as you want. Perhaps the commute was too far, or you disliked your manager's style of leadership. . If you take the pay rise - will those issues change? Chances are they won't. And where is the money coming from? They may have strict wages and salary guidelines they must follow. Kate - Fast forward 3 months You accepted Jim's offer and decided to stay at your existing company and take the pay rise. 12 weeks on and the reasons you wanted to leave have re-surfaced. Coupled with the fact that your colleagues have been slightly distant and appear less willing to share ideas, since they discovered you'd been offered another position. Even your pay rise didn't seem to go fas far as you thought. You've contacted a recruitment consultant who's looking for a new role for you. Jim - Fast forward 3 months Kate accepted the counter offer and for a while everything returned to normal. In the last two months however, she hasn't been hitting her previous high targets. You feel like you can't trust her as much as before. You've also noticed the other members of the team aren't as open with her and their is a trust issue starting to form. The team know Kate's basic salary is more than theirs and this has also caused resentment within the team. Frequently we see candidates offered various dangling carrots in an attempt to get them stay, including promises of promotions, pay rise or more employee benefits. Usually we'll receive a call in three to six months from the candidate saying they are looking again, as it just isn't working out because the reasons they wanted to leave in the first place have ultimately surfaced again. Think before you make a counter offer What are your options if you're Jim? While it may be tempting to counter offer a member of staff, there are a few things you might want to consider first: Do you know all the true issues why Kate has looked elsewhere for a new job? Are those reasons you can genuinely fix? If Kate is finding the commute too far it would be pointless to counter offer her. If she is unhappy with her current manager - could you move staff members? Or could you change her hours? If not, it may be wise to let the person go and start the process of replacing them. 80% of people who accept a counter offer leave within 6 - 12 months It's estimated that around 80% of people who accept counter offers will leave within 6 to 12 months. So really think it through before accepting. You'll only have to re-start the whole job hunting process again if doesn't work out. A consultant once described the counter offer situation as: "It's a bit like, being married, having an affair and then going back to the marriage expecting it all to be exactly as it was before." Did you find this article helpful? Why not read this article: '10 Things great leaders say every Monday (or Moanday)" If you would like chat  about your next career move or how we can help your business, contact Precision today on 0116 254 5411 or email hello@precision-people.uk today.

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  • Insider tips from specialist lift & escalator recruitment consultants.  Are you a lift or escalator engineer thinking about a new job? Then read on to discover some useful tips to help you secure your next job. There are a number of ways that you as an engineer, can enhance your opportunities of rising into your dream job this year (sorry! Had to get at least one pun in there). 1. Firstly, an NVQ level 3 is now becoming more of a mandatory requirement for most lift companies when getting your foot in the door. Having this will dramatically increase your chances of a new job or a promotion Unfortunately, if you're an engineer who entered the industry several years ago when qualifications weren't compulsory, you may be facing the struggles and frustration of a lack of job opportunities, despite having many years of experience and knowledge behind you. So, if your company offers you the opportunity to fund the qualification or you're able to fund it yourself, this is a MUST. You will broaden your horizons and be offered far more job service roles, especially from the larger firms. Tip: If you haven't got your NVQ level 3 - try approaching smaller lift and escalator firms who sometimes don't insist on this qualification. 2. Reputation is key. The escalator and lift industry is a tight network, in other words, everybody knows everyone! Be known for being dependable, hardworking and cooperative, this is likely to impact your promotion and future job opportunities. You don't want a reputation for someone who bends the rules or puts work colleagues in danger, this will undoubtedly tarnish your reputation and word is likely to spread quickly! 3. Are you a people person? If you have the ability to interact with a wide variety of people with a range of personalities and the capability to manage a team of engineers efficiently, you're likely to be a valuable asset to the company. You won't be so favourable if you have a tendency to rely on others, are a watcher rather than a doer and listener rather than a speaker. 4. Show commitment to your job role As a lift engineer, you'll need to be flexible in your work hours. It's a hard industry being on call for breakdowns or emergency jobs working overtime to get jobs done, however, if you're able to work around the clock, you will show that commitment and passion to your job which is a favourable quality. You don't want to be known as that person that always pulls a 'sickie', procrastinates on the job, or is forever moaning. Employers will brand you unreliable and not dependable. 5. Gain a broad coverage of product and equipment knowledge Your promotion or new job will draw ever closer if you show a willingness to expand your knowledge and skill sets. With a greater span of both, you're able to complete more tasks, take on jobs which require a greater skill level and teach others. If you are offered courses to attend - take the opportunity! 6. Employers and recruitment consultants are not fond of jumpers If you have moved jobs several times in the last few years, this may not look favourable compared with someone who has been with the same lift or escalator company for over five or six years, for example. If you have genuine reasons as to why you left then explain them in detail to your recruitment consultant. Changes out of your control are not a problem when talked over. If the roles were more junior, it is more accepted that you may be only employed in the job for one or two years, as you gain experience and grow. 7. Have you got the customer service skills to take you far? Be polite, pleasant and punctual when dealing with customers, it will make the customers experience with you and the company you represent enjoyable and memorable. You will also increase your chances of receiving positive feedback which can help motivate yourself, improve your performance, and most importantly, puts you in a favourable light with your employer. 8. Make your interests known Your boss won't necessarily consider you for a promotion if he doesn't know you're interested in a new position. If you make your goals known, your employer is likely to pay more attention to you and recognise your efforts and hard work. You may even be given more complex tasks and greater responsibilities where you can demonstrate your potential. 9. Have the right attitude Be the kind of person with a 'glass half full' mentality who focuses on the positives, and has solutions to problems. Immerse your positive attitude into your day to day job responsibilities to see an overall improvement in your performance at work. Your attitude may also encourage your colleagues to adopt a similar positive outlook, creating a better atmosphere and working environment. Be the go-to person and 'step up' when problems arise. 10. Find a specialist recruitment consultant Contacting a recruitment consultant who is a specialist within the lift and escalator industry will vastly increase your chances of landing a new service engineering job. They can identify the best companies for you to work for and liaise with them on your behalf with regards to salaries and benefits. This is far better than posting your CV on various jobs board. Find out more about our specialist lift & escaltor recruitment consultant by clicking here. Fancy a chat? Call 0116 2545411 or email Lindseyb@precisionrecruitment.co.uk 

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"Anand is a very trustworthy and honest recruiter, I would not hesitate in dealing with him in the future if the need arises!  It has been a pleasure working with him in the search for the job that will take me through to retirement. I w...
Shift Maintenance Engineer
Paul Watson
"It has been an absolute thrill and pleasure to work with Anand. Very professional, courteous and polite. He has got me into the desired role within days, making the whole process very easy. A true professional." ...
Multi-skilled Engineer
Florin-Bebe Rezeanu
"I know Anand through his handling of my recent recruitment to a new position after over two decades in my previous rôle. He handled the process with patience and a personable, supportive air, guiding me through to a successful conclusi...
Jon Tait, Chief Engineer
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